Easy & Quick Georgian Red Pepper Sauce Recipe

Recently I made some Georgian shashlyk and as you may have spied from the final photograph I served this with my take on the traditional Georgian red pepper sauce.  It doesn’t have to be served with shashlyk as it would go well with any grilled meat dish.  It’s really easy, all you need is a food processor or blender!

Ingredients

6 red peppers (bell or pointed)

2 red chilli peppers

3 medium sized tomatoes (or a selection of smaller ones)

3 garlic cloves, peeled

1 tsp fenugreek seeds, ground

1 tsp coriander seeds, ground

Bunch of fresh coriander

Instructions

Peppers in the UK never taste quite as nice as peppers abroad so in order to get a bit of extra flavour I put mine in a foil dish in a low-heated oven (about 150 degrees centigrade) and warmed them for 15 minutes

Cut the peppers, removing the middles, into chunks and place in food processor (or into a pot if you are going to use a hand-held blender) with all the other ingredients except the fresh coriander

Georgian Red Pepper Sauce

Blend but try to keep the mixture quite thick

Stir then chill in refrigerator for 30 minutes

Chop the fresh coriander and stir into the sauce

Georgian Red Pepper Sauce

Season to taste and serve

Georgian Shashlyk

To check out my shashlyk recipe go to Georgian shashlyk

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East European Bloggers

As a blogger and someone who works in social media I’m often asked what blogs I have saved in my bookmarks.  I thought I’d share a few of my favourite East European blogs with you all.

1: Edward Lucas

You can’t talk about Eastern Europe and not mention the Economist’s East European reporter, Edward Lucas.  Lucas recently published a book called the New Cold War, and while I don’t necessarily agree with all his analysis, it is worth a read.  His blog will keep you updated with the political and economic situation across the region.  Lucas is also promoting his brother’s plight for international recognition and commemoration of  Wojtek the Soldier Bear.

2: Dr Sean’s Diary

Dr Sean’s Diary is certainly worth a look if you want to read a bit more in-depth analysis, particularly about the political and economic situation, both past and present, in the Czech Republic.  Dr Hanley, a lecturer at SSEES, started the blog in 2006.  For anything remotely academic, visit his blog.

3: East European Food Guide

Barbara Rolek runs this food guide with everything you could ever want to know about East European food with plenty of recipes and videos.  Check it out (just make sure you aren’t too hungry!) for inspiration.

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Borscht Recipe

Hot, cold, Ukrainian, Russian, there are so many arguments had over this dish it’s not even worth listing them.  Ultimately, every family has their own version and this is mine.  It doesn’t quite meet the standard I consumed at Chernobyl but it’s a pretty good effort.  Though be warned, it isn’t a quick dish to prepare.

Borscht

Ingredients

5 to 6 beetroots

2 carrots, grated

1 cabbage wedge, grated

3 potatoes, cut into chunks

2 white onions, grated

3 cloves garlic, crushed

15ml tomato puree

Juice of 1/2 lemon

1 litre beef stock

300g boiled beef cut into chunks

3 tbsp rapeseed oil

Instructions

Put the beetroot in a saucepan

Cover with cold water

Heat until boiling and once come to temperature, lower to a simmer and leave for 1 hour to 1 hour 30 minutes

Borscht

Remove the beetroot from the pan and allow to cool

Borscht

Keep the liquid for later

Peel and grate the beetroot

Heat oil in a large saucepan

Add the onion, cabbage, garlic, beetroot, tomato puree and carrot to the saucepan

Borscht

Stir together and cook for 10 minutes on a medium heat

Add the potato to the saucepan

Cook for another 10 minutes

Add the stock and a ladle of the beetroot water

Borscht

Simmer for 30 minutes, add the lemon juice and serve

Can be served with a spoonful of smetana (sour cream), a sprinkling of dill and/or parsley and crusty bread

Borscht

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