An Introduction to Russian Zakuski (закуски)

Christmas Day Zakuski Cooking
Christmas Day Zakuski Cooking

When one thinks about Russia, be it the feasts of Ivan the Terrible, the European-style banquets of Peter the Great or even the large socio-political functions of Stalin, one conjures the images of excess, indulgence and merriment, all at the expense of the poverty-stricken masses.  But the truth is, even with little money, the Russians know how to put on a good spread for their guests.  Even those with little will open their door and greet their guests with the offering of a zakuski (закуски in Cyrillic).

Zakuski can be anything from a simple appetiser to a laden table.  The tradition began in the decadent Russian manor houses of the 18th Century when the tradition of opening a meal with vodka, bread and cold soups, gave way to open sandwiches, meat and fish.  Although the style of food changed, the diet remained relatively the same as before, with the exception of the introduction of cheese.

The Zakuski table would be ready to welcome guests inside from the harsh climate.  A bottle of vodka, or more popular among the elite, European Champagne or wines, took pride of place, as did the samovar full with hot tea.  Guests were invited to help themselves, mirroring the hospitality the Russians are famed for.

Zakuski Blini Platter
Zakuski Blini Platter

Among the delicacies, guests enjoyed salted cucumbers, sour cream (smetana), pickles, black bread and a simple meat or fish dishes.  The zakuski was designed to be quite different to the main meal, so if the main course was to be fish, meat appetisers were provided and vice versa.  Ensuring the table was an array of vibrant colours was important so the choice of ingredients was key: carrots, beetroot, cucumbers etc.

Blinis are an ideal component of the zakuski table.

Find out more about making blinis here…

Keep your eyes peeled for further information about this Russian tradition in Zakuski Part II.

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BBC Russian Season

bbcAs part of the much-anticipated Russian Season, the BBC is set to unravel the rich and fascinating world of Russian art for the first time in a three-part series on BBC Four.  The Art Of Russia is the story of a nation’s destiny – revolution and human conflict on a scale unparalleled in any other European country’s history of art.

Emerging from the most conservative of cultures into the most radical, Russian art triumphed against the odds.  This is the country that gave us Malevitch’s Black Square – a precursor of Rothko intensity – and the Faberge Egg… at the same time!

Episode one celebrates the great age of the icon, when Russia was at its most intense and inward looking.  Travelling to the northern wastes, art critic, Andrew Graham-Dixon, discovers the country’s most moving icons, the little known folk ‘Lubock’ art, antique Russia of the countryside, and Peter the Great’s artistic revolution.

Read more…

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