Celebrate with Grey Goose Le Fizz at The Savoy For Life’s Most Memorable Moments

Grey Goose Le FizzThe familiar stem, the tiny bubbles winking at the rim, the delicious sound of chinking glass and the crisp, cool taste of every sip.  The experience of drinking Goose Le Fizz is in every way as special as the memorable moments it celebrates.  Created using the finest French vodka, fresh lime juice and the most delicately floral elderflower cordial, the Grey Goose Le Fizz is shaken over ice and served in a champagne flute, topped with soda water for a truly exquisite taste.

Co‐created by Grey Goose’s newly-appointed UK Brand Ambassador Joe McCanta, Grey Goose le Fizz is Grey Goose’s latest offering, designed as Grey Goose’s alternative to champagne, and is the only drink to be seen celebrating with this party season.  Alongside some of London’s leading bars, Grey Goose le Fizz will be served in the beautifully re‐designed Beaufort Rooms at The Savoy. Historically seen as the most glamorous of London locations, over the years The Savoy has seen celebrities from Fred Astaire to Marilyn Monroe raise their glasses and toast memorable moments.

It is only fitting then, that to celebrate the hotel’s extensive refurbishment and modern day reopening, its expert bartenders will be serving Grey Goose le Fizz in the beautifully re‐designed Beaufort Rooms at The Savoy to today’s most discerning drinkers.  Chicer than a cocktail and more elegant than champagne, raise a toast to taste with a glass of Grey Goose le Fizz and celebrate life’s most memorable moments in style.

Grey Goose Fizz

Glassware: Champagne flute

What you need: 35ml Grey Goose vodka, 15ml fresh lime juice, 15ml elderflower cordial

Method: Shake over ice and serve, topped with soda

For more news from Grey Goose visit www.greygoose.com. Always drink responsible www. www.drinkaware.co.uk

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Russian Zakuski Part IV: Vodka

Russian Standard Vodka & Shot Glasses
Russian Standard Vodka & Shot Glasses

In the 10th Century Prince Vladimir the Great of Kievan Rus’ wanted to abandon paganism in favour of a more modern religion.  In the Primary Chronicle it is said Vladimir sent emissaries out to investigate alternatives.  When the emissaries returned and relayed what they had found out about Judaism, Christianity and Islam it is believed Vladimir rejected the option of Islam saying, ‘Rus’ loves to drink, we cannot be without it.’

Mead, kvas and beer met the imbibing demands of the Kievan Rus’ until the late 14h Century when spirits became available, probably via the Baltic.  However, there is some confusion over what exactly was available, vino being used to describe sprits distilled only once (unlike vodka) and also wine.  According to one Soviet historian, there seemed a complete absence of information on drinks like present-day vodka and if one is to believe written sources, only spread to Russia in the 16th Century.

Read more…

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An Introduction to Russian Zakuski (закуски)

Christmas Day Zakuski Cooking
Christmas Day Zakuski Cooking

When one thinks about Russia, be it the feasts of Ivan the Terrible, the European-style banquets of Peter the Great or even the large socio-political functions of Stalin, one conjures the images of excess, indulgence and merriment, all at the expense of the poverty-stricken masses.  But the truth is, even with little money, the Russians know how to put on a good spread for their guests.  Even those with little will open their door and greet their guests with the offering of a zakuski (закуски in Cyrillic).

Zakuski can be anything from a simple appetiser to a laden table.  The tradition began in the decadent Russian manor houses of the 18th Century when the tradition of opening a meal with vodka, bread and cold soups, gave way to open sandwiches, meat and fish.  Although the style of food changed, the diet remained relatively the same as before, with the exception of the introduction of cheese.

The Zakuski table would be ready to welcome guests inside from the harsh climate.  A bottle of vodka, or more popular among the elite, European Champagne or wines, took pride of place, as did the samovar full with hot tea.  Guests were invited to help themselves, mirroring the hospitality the Russians are famed for.

Zakuski Blini Platter
Zakuski Blini Platter

Among the delicacies, guests enjoyed salted cucumbers, sour cream (smetana), pickles, black bread and a simple meat or fish dishes.  The zakuski was designed to be quite different to the main meal, so if the main course was to be fish, meat appetisers were provided and vice versa.  Ensuring the table was an array of vibrant colours was important so the choice of ingredients was key: carrots, beetroot, cucumbers etc.

Blinis are an ideal component of the zakuski table.

Find out more about making blinis here…

Keep your eyes peeled for further information about this Russian tradition in Zakuski Part II.

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