Luxury for Less: Caspian Caviar

CaviarCaspian Caviar was set up by Suzanne Shepherd because, following a Cordon Bleu degree and years of sampling find foods, she thought Caviar was too delicious to be left in the hands of only a select few who could afford the prohibitively expensive price tag. Her mission was to make it more affordable and more widely available and she’s certainly enjoyed some considerable success.  Over the last ten years Caspian Caviar has become the number one online supplier in the UK and is believed to supply the lowest priced legal caviar in Europe. It is all caught processed and shipped under strict adherence to the CITES rules and regulations.

The online direct delivery service means you can have wild Royal Beluga, as well as the best farmed caviars sourced from across Europe, delivered to your door.  In fact, farmed Beluga is now Caspian Caviar’s most popular brand because it is both delicious and affordable.

To compliment the caviars, there is a whole range of luxury foods, carefully sourced by Suzanne, which again demonstrate that the biggest foodie treats can be affordable. There are fresh black and white Alba Truffles depending on the season, fresh Duck Foie Gras lobes, wonderful smoked salmon, delicious chocolates and specialist vodkas.

To check out the range of luxury food visit www.caspiancaviar.co.uk

Tel: 01453 844870

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The Merchant’s Yard: New Russian Deli, Knightsbridge, London

When I received an email a few weeks ago regarding the opening of a new and luxurious Russian deli in Knightsbridge I was literally thrilled.  Russians are renowned for feasting, from the medieval banquets of Ivan the Terrible to the elaborate political dinners of the communist era.  The Merchant’s Yard deli certainly celebrates this grand Russian tradition.

Owner, Julia Flit, has created a venue for opulent feasts and celebrations, providing shoppers with key Russian ingredients, in addition to an intimate space, ideal for small parties to be introduced to traditional fayre.  The shop contains everything from caviar to beetroot, staples in every Russian kitchen.

The Merchant's Yard, Russian Deli

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The Merchant's Yard, Russian Deli Facade, Knightsbridge, London

The Merchant’s Yard beings the opportunity to try authentic Russian homemade food that the capital has long lacked.  Finally, there is a venue doing real justice to the recipes of established customs, as well as more contemporary interpretations.  While every member of staff is on hand, ready to assist shoppers with every possible question.  Their own enthusiasm for the food is quickly very clear.

What you can expect:

The Deli Counter: Food prepared daily for eat-in or take-out including organic salads, freshly baked breads, cakes, pastries, coffees and teas.

The Grocery: For produce to enhance any table setting including cheeses, organic olives, homemade vegetable dishes, spirits, beers and Russian vodka, Moldavian and Georgian wine.

To Order: Recommendations from the Merchant’s Yard chef, for your own personal needs, when there is no time to cook for guests at home.

Dinners: Every third week of the month, for ten to 12 people, a seasonal menu will be prepared based on the traditions and customs of Russia; enhancing your appreciation and understanding of a style of cooking rooted in history.

The Merchant’s Yard

Purveyors of Russian Foods

41 Beauchamp Place

London SW3 1NX

Tel: 020 3144 0072

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The World’s Only Truly Sustainable Caviar

caviarMottra caviar is new to the UK and is the world’s only truly sustainable caviar. This is bang on trend with us being encouraged to choose more ethical and sustainable options, and since the release of film The End of the Line (The Inconvenient Truth of the fish world), our focus has been firmly on the oceans.

Last year, Mottra ‘sturgeon-friendly caviar’ was awarded the CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) certification. Priding itself on its eco-credentials Mottra is both ecologically and gastronomically gratifying.

Even in today’s economic climate, people want to enjoy such  delicacies as caviar, but maybe now more than ever, they want to know that the process used is sustainable and that the sturgeon are being looked after. Mottra is your eco-luxury ‘caviar with a conscience’.

Discerning caviar lovers will always have suffered from the knowledge that wild breeding sturgeon were killed to provide this world renowned delicacy.  Mottra has solved this dilemma with the use of modern technology and special techniques that encourage caviar production, while putting the sturgeon’s welfare first. Once the sturgeon is about five years of age the caviar gets gently massaged out of the fish – a process also known as ‘stripping’.  The fish is then put back into the perfect conditions of the Mottra pools, where it continues to grow and starts the next year’s process of caviar production.

Read more…

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The Perfect Canapes: Part 1

Kalinka Shop, 35 Queensway
Kalinka Shop, 35 Queensway

After visiting M&S and discovering their Russian blini offer for the Easter weekend, I was inspired to turn my hand to making my own.  Although I would normally scoff at the use of packet pancake mix, I thought, in the name of research I should try one of the box of blini mix sold at Kalinka on Queensway (www.kalinkafood.co.uk).

“Round is the blin, yellow gold and hot like the sun, the symbol of sublime days, rich harvests, harmonious marriages and healthy children,” is how the Russian poet, Alexander Kuprin (1870-1983) described the light pancakes.

In pre-Christian Rus’ blini were eaten on feast days in honour of Wolos, patron saint of fertility, cattle and the arts.  The original form of the word blin was mlin, deriving from the Russian word for milling and referring to the dish made from the ground grains.

Blini continue to be one of the favourite foods in Russia today and are sold on every corner in Moscow and elsewhere.  However, true Muscovites get together with friends for a blini feast.  Traditional blinis are wafer thin and made on a cast-iron skillet.  The original recipe for blinis is two-thirds buckwheat flour and one-third wheat flour.  This is refined with rich cream and frothy beaten egg whites.  Sour cream can be used as a substitute for the cream and creates a heartier blini.  Blinis made from buckwheat flour alone are called red blini due to their dark colour.

Soft, porous and with transparent bubbles, means the blinis soak up melted butter and cream wonderfully. The cooked pancakes are best eaten hot with butter, cream, honey, cranberry jelly, pickled herring, smoked salmon or caviar.  On feast days they can also be served with offal or beef.  The pancakes are served in every home during Butter Week, during which Christians prepare themselves for Lent (although it is originally a Slavic pagan feast which ushered out the winter and welcomed the spring).

I chose to use the blinis as part of a selection of canapes.  Unfortunately, due to my meagre salary, I did not invest in a small jar of caviar and instead opted to team the blinis with Alaskan smoked salmon and prawns.  I served these with Hungarian stuffed mushrooms, the recipe of which will be in The Perfect Canapes: Part 2.

Blini Packet

The 300g box contains a small packet of dried yeast and a baking mix containing wheat flour, dry vegetable cream, sugar and salt and costs just £1.80 but will provide you with about 28 blinis.
Instructions:

Pour the packet of baking mix into a large bowl.

Pour in the packet of dry yeast.

Make a well in the middle.

Pour in 250 ml of warm water or milk

(I used milk which meant the blinis were quite dense, for a thinner mix, use water)

Stir until the mix becomes a dough.

Stir dough until there are no lumps

Cover with either a clean tea towel or cling film.

Leave to prove somewhere warm for 30 minutes.

Heat a frying or griddle pan over a medium heat.

Use a spoon to put a little of the mixture in the pan.

Blinis in frying pan

A good tip is to have a cup of cold water to put the spoon in.  The mixture is very sticky and the water on the spoon will help the mixture to fall off.

When some bubbles appear on the surface of the uncooked side, and it goes a little shiny, turn with a palette knife.

Leave to cool.

Add a teaspoon of creme fraiche to each blini.

Add some smoked salmon or prawns to each blini.

Season with black pepper.

Squeeze over lemon juice (lemon rind can also be sprinkled over for a decorative effect, or if you want a traditional Russian taste, some dill).

Blinis

Close up

Blini Platter

Blini Platter

Serve with selection of canapes and chilled cava

Serve canapes with chilled cava

If you would rather make the blinis from scratch you will need:

3 tsp dry yeast

3 tbsp sugar

2 cups/500 ml lukewarm milk

25g butter, softened

300g buckwheat flour

200g all-purpose flour

2 eggs, separated

1 tsp salt

175g sour cream

Butter for frying

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