Kitchenette Opens in the UK this November

Kitchenette in Putney
Kitchenette in Putney

After some delays, Turkish all-day restaurant cafe chain, Kitchenette, will open its first outpost in the UK on 18th November, 2013 (it was originally slated to open in September).

It’s no secret that I completely fell in love with Istanbul when I visited in 2009 and I have fond memories of spending some time in a couple of the Kitchenette outposts in the city, drinking coffee and eating cake, so its arrival in London has got me rather excited.

Kitchenette first launched in Turkey in 2005. The chain has expanded to boast 24 branches, not just in Turkey but also Baku (to read more of my tips on visiting, eating and drinking in Azerbaijan go here), Moscow and St Petersburg.

The London restaurant will open at 200-204 Putney Bridge SW15 2NA. Restaurant interiors have been designed by Michaelis Boyd. The 80-cover restaurant will feature lots of warm natural timbers and handmade tiles. In terms of food, you can expect good brasserie dishes, a few daily specials and excellent desserts in a really relaxed environment. It’s thought that the brand plans to expand quickly in London and potentially elsewhere in the UK.

Kitchenette is owned by TAG Restaurant Holdings which invested in Tom Aikens’ dining concept, Tom’s Kitchen. However, Square Meal reports (read more here) that the  Michelin-starred chef is likely to only play a very minor, executive chef role.

Kitchenette 200-204 Putney Bridge SW15 2NA

www.kitchenette.com.tr

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Top 10 Things To Do In Belgrade

Belgrade - Serbian FlagSearching for a cheap city break this year proved somewhat elusive, even in Eastern Europe.  However, on in-depth investigation a three-night/four-day break in Belgrade still seemed to be offering a veritable bargain with direct flights and hotel accommodation costing just £500 for two people.  So a few weeks ago, I boarded a plane from Heathrow Terminal 5 and set off to explore yet another Balkan country.  Belgrade is a great city, with tons of cultural and gastronomic offerings.  Yet, it is actually quite small in comparison to cities such as St Petersburg, even London.  This means that you can easily walk around it without needing to pay for transport.  Not that transport costs much – the bus from the airport charges just 80 dinar for a ticket into the city centre (that’s less than £1!)

So what is there to do?  So many people were shocked when I said I was visiting Belgrade for a holiday.  They seemed to be under the illusion that it would still be war-torn, and that it would be a place filled with oppressive buildings and a depressing vibe.  This is not the case at all!  Of course there is poverty, but there is poverty in Britain and many other, so-called advanced, western countries.  There were a few domineering buildings built during the Communist era but many of the buildings were typically Austro-Hungarian in design.  I think too many people forget that Serbia has a rich cultural history; this country was not formed and built solely in the Yugoslav period, it has taken centuries to compile this, albeit complicated, land, people and culture.

Here is my top 10 list of everything I think you should do when you visit Belgrade:

1) On arrival, take the bus from the airport into the city centre – it costs less than £1 though be prepared with change for the bus driver!  There’s a shuttle bus every hour but I’d rather opt for the local No. 71 any day, of which they arrive on, and at, half-past the hour.  After passing through customs, simply turn left and go up the escalator.  Continue walking straight on (into domestic departures) until you reach the end of the building.  The bus stops just outside the final, automatic door, on your right and takes about 30 minutes into the city centre, near Trg Republik.

2) Spend half a day wandering around the Kalmegdan Tvrdjava or Fortress.  If you love history then this is the place to head.  It really does illustrate the regions military might over the last 2,000 years.  There are turrets, towers, bridges, museums in abundance for you to explore.  However, even if history, particularly military history, isn’t your thing, the fortress itself offers some spectacular views across the Danube and Sava rivers and out into the surrounding countryside.  There are also temporary exhibitions in the grounds – at the moment there is an art exhibition illustrating how Russia is viewed by non-Russians.

3) Stroll along Knez Mihailova – the city’s main shopping street.  You’d be mistaken for thinking that the latest fashion trends have not hit Serbia.  There are designer and fantastic high street offerings in abundance.  Time it right and visit during the sales because there really are some fabulous bargains to be had!  Plus, this street is just overflowing with beautiful buildings, so make sure you take in the gorgeous facades which date back to the zenith of the Austro-Hungarian influence in the region.

4) Travel back in time at Konak Kneginje Ljubice (Princess Ljubica’s House).  Situated a few minutes on foot from the city centre this surprisingly large house whisks you back to the Ottoman Empire.  The 19th century mansion was home to Princess Ljubica, wife of  Miloš Obrenović and her sons.  It was converted into a museum and houses ornaments, furniture, books, clothes, portraits, landscapes, glasses, medals, and so much more.  The design of the house is particularly impressive, with several large rooms built for the sole purpose of conversation.  The grand hallways are most spectacular.

5) Just a few metres down the road from Knoak Kneginje Ljubice stands the Saborna Crkva Sv Arhangela, Belgrades ornate Orthodox Cathedral or Holy Archangel Michael Church.  The facade, with its glistening golden icons is visually stunning.  Inside the walls are adorned with gold, chandeliers hang from the ceiling and locals pray to, touch and kiss the icons.  This is quite a different experience from a Catholic or Protestant church.  Believers are much more interactive with their icons and God.  It really is interesting to watch, even if not particularly taken with religion.

6) Take some time out at Ruski Car (Russian Tsar).  This traditional kafana was originally called Zagreb, however, after the civil war during the 1990s, it was re-named and re-decorated.  On the walls hang portraits of the Tsars and Tsarinas dating back to Ivan the Terrible.  A grand piano sits in one corner and chandeliers hang from the ceiling.  The menu is vast but it is the cake counter which is not to be missed.  Order some tea čaj (with rum if you desire) and my favourite borovnica torta which is a blueberry tart with hazelnut cream and chocolate.  The decor and the food are the ultimate in decadence!

7) If you’re looking for a more substantial meal, be it of local cuisine (čevapčiči, burek, sarma, gibanica etc.), or something a little more international (pizza, pasta etc.) then visit Skadarska ulica.  This is a very pretty area of the city, with one main cobbled street, lined with restaurants.  It’s not too pricey either so you can enjoy some great food and some house wine without breaking the bank.  It can get pretty busy here in the evenings and it always has a great atmosphere.

8) If you are like me and love food and culture then supermarkets and markets are not to be missed.  There is a great market, Kalenic Pijaca, where locals sell their home-grown produce – arguably the best fruit and vegetables you’ll see in Europe – as well as quirky souvenirs, old books, communist memorabilia etc.  Go on Friday or Saturday when it is at its most bustling.  As always with such places, do beware pickpockets.

9) A little further out of town is Sveti Sava (St Sava’s Church).  Much like Gaudi’s La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, the cathedral remains unfinished.  Yet its sheer size is impressive, as are the icons on its facade.  The construction of the building began at the end of the 19th century.  The original marble work is incredible.  Unfortunately, most recently the builders have opted for concrete.  Nevertheless, the scale of the project is something to be marvelled at.

10) In the same direction (walkable but for those who would prefer to get the bus, take trolleybus 40 or 41 both of which stop by the rather imposing and grand post office, near the parliament building) is the Kuva Cveca – Tito Memorial Complex or House of Flowers.  The complex has three museums: a museum of artefacts (interesting for those who enjoy social and cultural history), the dictator’s mausoleum which also displays presidential rooms and a collection of batons used in the Presidential Day ceremonies, and a museum of diplomatic donations which houses gifts to Tito from the people of Yugoslavia and heads of state from other, generally sympathetic to a form of communism, nations.  The mausoleum is surprisingly airy and boasts spectacular views across the city.

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Like Food? Love Tallinn

Tallinn Old Town
Tallinn Old Town

Estonia’s colourful, pocket-sized capital is fast becoming a culinary centre for food lovers. Restaurants specialising in a new, modern style of Estonian cooking now proliferate and 4* and 5* hotels, spas and manor houses with award-winning chefs and restaurants can easily be found. Visitors to the capital can also try their own hand at chocolate making, making marzipan sweets, cooking Estonian cuisine and visiting vinoteques and breweries.For visitors wanting to taste the source of food in Estonia, specialist and locally produced food can be purchased from local growers and suppliers at the Rotermann Market, which rubs shoulders with historic conversions and high tech buildings in the Rotermann Quarter. There are also smaller specialist food outlets, such as NOP an organic shop and cafe which plans to organise foodie events, such a Saturday morning “Morning at Gourmet Market”, offering produce directly from manufacturers and importers.

Chocolate & sweet production
Anneli Viik Chocolate Café promotes the production, and consumption, of fine chocolate and hand-made sweets. Run by a former successful financier who fancied a career change, the venue combines a café, chocolate shop and the opportunity to see the chocolatiers at work, and for small groups to pre-book to join them in creating hand-made chocolates.

Chocolate and coffee is at the heart of two `Chocolaterie de Pierre’s’ cafés in Tallinn and one in Tartu in southern Estonia.  The first Chocolaterie de Pierre café opened in Tallinn’s Old Town in 2003 and has since been offering hand made chocolate, coffees and light snacks, with the opportunity for small groups to create their own confections.

Read more…

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